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Paris

Saint Laurent

Fall 2017 Ready-to-Wear

Paris

Saint Laurent

Fall 2017 Ready-to-Wear

Paris

BY Katharine K. Zarrella

February 28, 2017

• “I love Monsieur Saint Laurent’s subversive approach to clothes, his dark romanticism with a hint of perversity,” wrote Anthony Vaccarello in his Fall 2017 show notes. “I wanted this collection to be like a re-reading, a radical fantasy of this heritage.”

• In his second runway romp for Saint Laurent, Vaccarello tried to take the collection in a more editorial, less commercial direction. 

• Sometimes this worked, sometimes it didn’t. 

• To be honest, save for a handful of ruched leather dresses with pointed shoulders, I wish he had cut the first half of his 106 look collection and started around look 63, when the diamante-embellished wares began to march on through. That was a cohesive story, and one that nodded to Saint Laurent’s ‘80s excess while still keeping it all in 2017. The finale dress, a below-the-knee crystal number with strong shoulders, was to die for. 

• Another standout was his shimmering, crystal-embellished fisherman knit sweater, paired with second-skin jeans and knee-high crystal boots. That sweater will probably cost a fortune, but boy, was it a knockout. 

• Elsewhere, the collection seemed to jut off in different directions, and some of the more dramatic pieces—those shearling-lined gloves that exploded at the shoulder, the asymmetrical mini-dresses with odd bits of fabric protruding from different directions, the scrunched boots that appeared throughout—seemed to be trying a bit too hard. 

• To be fair, I think any young designer who had just inherited an iconic French heritage house from a near legendary designer who had skyrocketed its profits to north of $800 million, would try too hard. It’s a daunting task, and Vaccarello is holding his own. 

• However, my advice to the talent would be to keep it simple. This collection would have been much stronger with a tighter edit, because there was a lot of good here—the skinny trousers, the louche interpretations of Le Smoking, the leather bombers—it just got lost amongst the noise. 

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