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London

Astrid Andersen

Fall 2018 Menswear

London

Astrid Andersen

Fall 2018 Menswear

London

BY William Buckley

January 7, 2018

For Fall 2018, Astrid Anderson was inspired by Buffalo—not the place or the plaid or the pack animal, but the art and fashion movement founded by stylist Ray Petri in the 1980s. It isn’t a movement that’s as widely recognized today as the punk or the gothic movements of the era, and while it was fashion and photography-centric, perhaps the most persisting piece of the legacy is Neneh Cherry’s hit single, “Buffalo Stance,” the lyrics of which embody much of what the movement was about—rebellious attitudes to the mainstream, individuality, diversity, self-respect, and style. The movement was a collective of photographers, designers, artists, models, and musicians, including a 14-year-old Naomi Campbell, and cofounder, photographer Mark Lebon. Talking to Andersen backstage, Lebon interrupted to give his congrats. “That’s Mark,” Andersen explained as he walked away, “He was part of Buffalo, the inspiration. He took this photo of Jenny Howerth,” she said as she gestured to a look on the mood board that featured a photo of a woman in a mask, “and this is her daughter, Georgia, wearing the piece on the runway.” At that point, Georgia appeared to congratulate Andersen also. The references to the movement were evident in the collection beyond the photographic prints—the mash-up of cultures that Buffalo celebrated manifested as bandanas, cowboys hats, puffer jackets, and skirts. In the Petri-styled shoots synonymous with Buffalo’s wider impact on British style, multi-ethnic men, not models, would wear all these things, challenging gender binaries and celebrating diversity.  Andersen’s signature streetwear—jacquard and lace tracksuits—also included plaid and argyle, both nods to the Scottish heritage of the Buffalo movement’s founder.

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