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Paris

Ann Demeulemeester

Fall 2018 Ready-to-Wear

Paris

Ann Demeulemeester

Fall 2018 Ready-to-Wear

Paris

BY Erinn Hermsen

March 1, 2018

Along the gilded marble halls of the Université Paris Descartes, not quite a one-eighty from creative director Sébastien Meurnier, but not far off. The typical infusion of romantic femininity, that he’s  suffused throughout both his men’s and women’s collections since he started was scaled so far back. Where were the ticklish fronds of ostrich or other frolicsome feathers? No ruffles? No lace? I have relished all those things, but truth be told, I have ofttimes wondered, particularly in his menswear’s case but also pour les femmes, who was wearing all this dreamlike gothic fairytale wear. That vision—both guys and girls in rippling silk, or tulle with tiny floral embroidery, and shirts with fluted necks like the bard of some Shakespearean play, or that the playwright himself might scribe his latest artistic endeavor in—with a quill plucked from his wide brimmed felt hat perhaps—was changed. Even at his men’s Fall 2018 show, which was shown alongside his women’s Pre-Fall, the “mi’lord and lady” vernacular was intact—think Gwennie and Joseph Fiennes in Shakespeare in Love—waistcoats over silk shirts with knee high riding boots, or vampish velvet coats in royal purple or pink. We all want to be handsome prince or (/and) pretty princesses, but whether we want to dress the part day to day is up for debate—a different story if you will. Well, this season, Meurnier’s changed tack. Still sky-high black leather boots paired with equally lofty leather evening gloves, but oh baby, much more BDSM. Leather straps and belts rippled like whips, or were belted around waists like that dominatrix essential,  the harness. There was still some of that Elizabethan flair—those ruffled shorts like bunched up bloomers in black worn above black stockings under thigh high black boots—but it wasn’t as fanciful or whimsical—this bitch meant business. And when the show was done, a buyer sitting next to me expressed sentiments that he would be able to buy more of the collection than in seasons past—which, baby, also means business. 

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