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London

Craig Green

Spring 2018 Menswear

London

Craig Green

Spring 2018 Menswear

London

BY William Buckley

June 12, 2017

Craig Green epitomizes exactly what London Fashion Week Men’s has come to stand for: Exciting young designers with an energy and aesthetic entirely their own—designers who break the rules, or write new rules, and are less constrained by the business structures of so many bigger brands.

One of many young designers established through the platforms provided by Lulu Kennedy/Fashion East and Gordon Richardson/Topman, Green’s buzz among the stylish set sees no signs of slowing.

Fashion editors and insiders by the boatload flock to Dover Street Market to nab the new collection. A word to the wise: The sale conveniently starts just as London Fashion Week Mens does, so right on time for that city-wide influx of fashion. Why, even in this habitat of mark-down mayhem, you are liable to spot such fashion icons as Nick Wooster flipping through the Craig Green rack. He was there last Saturday. I saw him.

And to be expected, this Spring 2018 collection will be no less lusted after than Fall. Less strappy than the last few seasons, Spring 2018 saw string—ropes and tassels that rippled as the models walked. 

Many of Green’s carefully established codes were out again in full force, notably quilting in a familiarly muted palette of pink and beige or an unexpected vibrant blast of rich fruit punch-colored prints—sunsets, a pair of parrots, or a desert island, oversized on huge hooded ponchos.

While some artists struggle to articulate the motivation or inspiration behind the work they produce, Green talks to his process with an excited ease. “The last few seasons have been so dystopian and melancholic, so this time, we started with utopia and positivity,” he explained post show. “But then I was talking to someone about paradise who suggested it as just an aesthetic. They pointed out that everyone has the same idea of paradise, but actually paradise isn’t the same for any of us—a palm tree and a beach and that kind of heavenly feeling is just a stereotypical concept, which is something I’d never thought about like that. And then the darkness crept in.”

The collection did start off dark. The first look was all dark denim with a huge, murky green kite-like object fastened to the model’s front like some procession fetish held by the high priest of an ancient, pagan order.

By the end though, the color and the oversized patterns of palm trees and “paradise” were slightly more playful, despite the mysterious, voluminous, hooded silhouettes that, sans patterns, would be happily at home on the demonic priest in some gothic horror flick.

Perhaps then, Green can leave the whimsy to others more prone to it, and embrace the malevolence he’s so clearly drawn to. Another astonishing collection from one of the most exciting designers today.

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